Fall 2019 Courses

Requirements

How to Enroll

Full-time students must enroll for a minimum of 12 credits to fulfill program requirements. We encourage you to enroll in additional courses up to 18 credit hours per semester. Students in both degree programs have one free elective, which they may use to take a course in another School in either Fall or Spring.

Registration Period: August 10-23 (Phase II)

Enroll at oscar.gatech.edu

 

Requirements for MS-GMC:

12 credit enrollment minimum:

  • Core course: GMC 6001: Foundations of Global Media and Cultures (3 credits)
  • Language track: 1 6000-level language course (ML) (3 credits)
  • Media track: 1 6000-level LMC course with a global orientation (3 credits)
  • Elective: 1 6000-level course in either ML or LMC (3 credits)

13-18 credits: additional electives, VIP teams, individual projects, extracurricular credit hours

  • Students completing a GRA-ship must enroll in ML 8801 (1 credit) in addition to the required 12 credit minimum.

 

Requirements for MS-ALIS:

12 credit enrollment minimum:

  • Core course: SPAN 6501: Theory and Foundations (3 credits)
  • Language courses: 3 6000-level courses in Spanish (ML) (9 credits)

13-18 credits: additional electives, VIP teams, individual projects, extracurricular credit hours

  • Students completing a GRA-ship must enroll in ML 8801 (1 credit) in addition to the required 12 credit minimum.

 

Core Courses

Core Courses


GMC 6001: Foundations of Global Media and Cultural Studies 
Tues/Thurs, 1:30-2:45 pm | Instructors: Annika Orich (ML), Greg Zinman (LMC) | CRN: 91363 

This is a required course for all students completing the M.S. in Global Media and Cultures, team-taught by ML and LMC faculty. Students gain a theoretical grounding in analyzing and navigating cross-cultural and multimedia contexts; they also design the preliminary proposal for their final project in consultation with the advising team. Course themes will explore a global issue across multiple contexts and forms, with case studies and topics varying based on student interest, current global affairs, and faculty expertise. Taught in English, 3 credits.Required for MS-GMC

 

SPAN 6501: Theory and Foundations Seminar
Tues/Thurs, 9:30-10:45 am | Instructors: Kelly Comfort, Osvaldo Cleger, Juan Carlos Rodriguez | CRN: 91283

This course is required for students pursuing the MS-ALIS or BS/MS-ALIS, and can count as a Spanish-language elective for the MS-GMC. The course covers theoretical texts related to three course modules: (1) Social and Intercultural Studies; (2) Literary, Media Studies and Technology; or (3) Linguistics and Language Application.  It will introduce students to major theoretical readings and requires their application in a variety of assignments. The main objective of the course is to increase theoretical knowledge and practical applications in key areas of language and culture study. By providing a three-pronged foundation in culture, literature/media, and linguistics, graduate students will be prepared to research and work in a variety of sectors upon completion of their degree. Taught in Spanish, 3 credits.Required for MS-ALIS Spanish

 

ML 8801: Building Community: Culture, Identity, Diversity, Inclusion
Every other Tuesday, 4:30-6:20 pm, starting August 27th | Instructors: Dr. Jenny Strakovsky (ML), Dr. Sheree Gibson (GT Housing) | CRN: TBA

This is a required course for students doing a GRA-ship. Using a project-based format, the course introduces students to major frameworks and best practices in cultural management and culture creation, community-building, leadership, and diversity and inclusion. Students will work with material from psychology, sociology, organizational behavior, gender studies, and cross-cultural communication. The course offers a foundation and springboard for students to apply these methods to their professional projects as GRAs. They will have opportunities to develop their projects, provide and receive feedback, reflect on skills learned, and propose new initiatives that can positively impact Georgia Tech. First meeting: August 27th, Taught in English, 1 credit. Required for Graduate Research Assistants

Modern Languages

Modern Languages Electives

Below are the elective courses currently scheduled in each of our language tracks. Please check oscar.gatech.edu for the most up-to-date information on courses offered this semester. 

 

Chinese


CHIN 8803/4022: ST Kungfu & Wuxia Film
Mon/Wed/Fri, 12:10-1:10 | Instructor: Paul Foster | CRN: 91739

Using authentic Kungfu fiction and Wuxia film, this proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the students’ development skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese. Student levels in class may vary, and as such, evaluation will be based upon effort, which is particularly applicable as we aspire to mastery of authentic material. Grad students in this course will deeply research and integrate the issues of intellectual discourse in China (including issues of colonialization, imperialism, modernization, cultural transformation, high/low culture, etc.) as demonstrated in by the television and film stars in adaptation of the martial arts texts, as well as the industry. Assignments include a character journal, and as well as a semester research project & presentation.

 

CHIN 6510: Language Practicum 
Meeting times and instructor TBC based on course

Gain teaching and research experience by serving as an apprentice instructor in a 3000- or 4000-level course. Apprentices are not traditional TAs. They take a leadership role in the course by conducting research on course topics, teaching 1-2 sessions of the course, and designing teaching materials in the target language. This course provides training in research, teaching, advising, and leadership. Appointments must be approved by the faculty instructor and program advisors. In order to do a Language Practicum, please contact the instructor of the course and the Program Director of the language program via one email, and please copy Dr. Strakovsky and Dr. Rodriguez.

 

French

FREN 8803/4005: Contemporary French Literature
Tues/Thurs, 1:30-2:45 pm | Instructor: Stephanie Boulard | CRN: 91708

Contemporary French literature will be considered from approximately after World War I to the present time. As any other, French literature depends on both the development of the literature and the language preceding this period. It also reflects social conditions and prevailing winds of thought during this time. Themes/topics to be studied during the course include love and relationships, death, world war II, feminism, abortion, autobiography/diary writing and its relation to art, and others.

 

FREN 8803/4300: France and Globalization
Tues/Thurs, 12:00-1:15 | Instructor: Nora Cottille-Foley | CRN: 91361

The class is divided in three main parts. The first part covers the development of Europe as well as the relationship between France and its neighbors, and analyzes the consequences of colonization in the Americas and Africa. The second part starts with the French Revolution and covers Modernity, the increasing importance of Paris in Europe, the Second Empire, the Second French colonial empire, orientalism and “Expositions Universelles” in Paris. The third part examines the growing conflict between France and Prussia led to WWI and eventually to the devastations of WWII. In the third part, we examine reconstruction and efforts toward creating a peaceful Europe; the relationship of France to North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa and Europe; and contemporary French attitudes toward Europe, immigration, industries, finance, investments, banks, and governments.

 

FREN 8803/4105: Francophone Cinema
Mon/Wed, 6:00-7:15 pm | Instructor: Chris Ippolito | CRN: 91354

This course will introduce students to representations of Africa in light of its modern history and culture through modern and contemporary Francophone films.  Focus will be on West African and North African films, and European movies dealing with these regions. Students will develop their analysis skills related to Francophone film and representations of Africa; analyze and present in French on content/issues related to Francophone film and representations of Africa (from colonialism to present); improve their oral and written communication skills at the mid-advanced level; and understand the importance of film in French-speaking cultures. Students will be produce two papers and biweekly presentations, as well as engage actively with their classmates’ work.

German

 GRMN 6028/4028: Americanization and Anti-Americanism in the Federal Republic
Tues/Thurs, 3:00-4:15 pm | Instructor: Jan Uelzmann | CRN: 91394

 This course explores how central the influence of US culture was and continues to be on the sociocultural development of the FRG. Apart from discussing the highly dynamic and at times controversial reception of US culture, we gain an overview on anti-American tendencies in Germany and how these changed throughout the development of the FRG. The course collectively develops a working notion of “culture,” “cultural exchange,” and “Americanization.” Using these terms to analyze case studies from diverse domains such as film, science and technology, literature, politics, news, advertising, and photography, we will trace the history of US-culture in the FRG from 1945 to 1989 and during unified Germany. Taught in German, 3 credits

 

GRMN 6010/4010: Perspectives on German Media
Mon/Wed/Fri, 1:55-2:55 pm | Instructor: Britta Kallin | CRN: 91257

This class covers a wide range of different types of media: traditional media such as newspapers, magazines, documentaries, feature films, TV shows and films as well as recent media such as websites, Twitter, FB, and other social media networks. We cover the history of media in Germany, Austria and Switzerland and the media landscape as it has developed over the last 60 years. Students will learn the theoretical foundations of media history analysis; examine a variety of German-language internet, TV, blog, social media, and print news media; analyze real and fake news; and develop advanced level language skills in writing, speaking, and reading.

 

Japanese

JAPN 6183/4183: Songs, Culture, and Society
Mon/Wed/Fri, 9:05-9:55 pm | Instructor: Amanda Weiss | CRN: 91264

There is a saying that “Music reflects the times, and the times reflect the music”, and it is thought that songs from different periods in Japan are reflections of the general mood of Japan, its people, and its culture of those times.  In this course, we will examine a set of songs as we study the political, economic, social, and cultural background from which they arise. Through this process, our goal will be to learn about Japanese culture and society by closely observing the clever connection between the melodies and the lyrics, the relationships between the artists and the themes, and the glimpses of the underlying background visible in the lyrics.  Specifically, this course will examine representative Japanese music reflecting the economic backdrop from the WWII time, the post-war period, the subsequent rapid economic expansion leading to Japan’s emergence as an economic world power and into the bubble economy and subsequently the post-bubble economy. It also features the social and political environment of anti-war protests and student demonstrations, and the changing of the times evident in a globalizing Japan. This course is also called “Japanese Culture through Songs.”

 

JAPN 8803/4123: Technical and Business Translation in Japanese
Tues/Thurs, 12:00-1:15 pm | Instructor: Masato Kikuchi | CRN: 91674

This class differs from all the other Japanese classes you may have taken so far. The purpose of this course is not simply to learn Japanese. Rather, through this course, you will learn about issues and practice in translation between Japanese and English. This is a content-based and practice-based course that focuses on translation between Japanese and English, primarily in, but not limited to, the field of technical and business-oriented language. Students will learn to use English and Japanese translation theories to discuss various issues in translation. They will practice dealing with the common challenges typically involved in translating between Japanese and English, including the structural differences between Japanese and English and the cultural variance in style that pose challenges during translation. This course will start by examining commercially available machine translation services, followed by a series of assignments designed to hone your skills as well as two term projects. Students are also expected to participate actively in the online discussion forum to develop an understanding of theoretical aspects of translation.

Russian

RUSS 6360/4360: Russian Culture through Song
Tues/Thurs, 12:00-1:15 pm | Instructor: Stuart Goldberg | CRN: TBC

 In this course, songs are both the object of study and a stepping off point for broader discussion and writing as we explore key issues in the last 80+ years of Russian and Soviet culture and history. We use an online annotation interface to analyze materials, and songs run the gamut 1930s popular music to bards, rock, and contemporary forms. Topics include: the fate of the capable individual in Brezhnev’s Russia, gypsy song in Russian culture, Soviet attitudes toward jazz and Western musical forms, as well as the subcultures that formed around them, the history of the Soviet/Russian national anthem, satire and irony in challenging official discourse, the Soviet experience during World War II, Putin’s Russia in the Chechen war, prayer and religion in Russia and the Soviet Union, camp life, the cult of the hero (Gagarin), glasnost era rock music and youth alienation, complicated love for the motherland, communism in a post-communist era, the compromise of or adherence to principles in choosing a career, emigration. Taught in Russian, 3 credits


RUSS 8803/4300: Imperial Imagination
Tues/Thurs, 3:00-4:15 pm | Instructor: Dina Khapaeva | CRN: 91493

The course examines how Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet culture constructed the representations of the parts of the former Russian/Soviet empire and ideological purposes these representations served over the last three centuries. The course explores Russian nationalist discourse and addresses the role that these cities and regions play in Russian imperial imagination. We will examine how Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet prose, poetry, and film constructed the representations of these these cities and regions and what ideological and aesthetic purposes these representations served at various stages of their existence. We will study how the heritage of Russian classical 19th-century writers, poets, and artists was adopted in the 20th-century literature and movies. We will discuss what these cities and regions meant for poets and writers of the late Russian Empire, and what new meaning they acquired in the early days of the Soviet regime and under Stalin. We will consider what functions the images of these cities and regions acquired for Russians after the collapse of the USSR. Finally, we will explore how these multi-layered images are used in contemporary Russian  ideology. Our analysis of literature and film will be informed by the exploration of the historical context.

Spanish

SPAN 6270/4270: Spanish Sociolinguistics
Mon/Wed, 3:00-4:15 pm | Cecilia Montes-Alcala | CRN: 91287 

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. The course covers topics such as speech community, phonological and syntactic variation across and within varieties of Spanish in Spain, Latin America and the US, as well as languages in contact, bilingualism, pragmatics, language attitudes and language identity, language and the law, language and age, and language and gender. Taught in Spanish, 3 credits
 

SPAN 4360/6360: Covering Arts & LatinX American Culture in the U.S.
Wednesday, 3:00-5:45 pm | Instructor: Paul Alonso | CRN: 91289

In times when international and cultural reporting have considerably decreased in the U.S. media and the Latino population in the U.S. has become the largest minority in the country, stories and alternative narratives about Latin American cultures are not only scarce, but also tend to be superficial portraits and simplistic generalizations of complex societies heavily filtered through the Mexican experience. Latin American multilayered, hybrid cultures are rarely explored in relation to the local and transnational tensions that shape their struggle for identity, their connections and contradictions in relation to the United States, and their negotiations within today’s global media culture. In times of xenophobia and extreme political discourses based on ethnocentric assumptions (or plain ignorance), this course aims at offering students critical thinking tools in order to approach other cultural realities that resist regional stereotyping, while at the same time actively participating in the investigation, production, and post-production phases of the development of creative multimedia content.


SPAN 6405/4405: Latin American Documentaries
Tues/Thurs, 12:00-1:15 pm | Instructor: Juan Carlos Rodriguez | CRN: 91291

Documentaries are audio-visual arguments, modes of expressing ideas and feelings using images and sound. In this course we will study the documentary traditions of Chile, Argentina and Cuba to learn about the history of Latin American societies. Students will analyze Latin American documentaries based on various concepts of documentary studies: authenticity, evidence, authority, persuasion, and ethics. Students will also learn how to classify documentaries according to their formal properties. We will use an interdisciplinary focus to investigate the role of geography, history, politics, technologies and social identities in the creation and reception of documentaries. Students will identify different types of documentaries from different regions of Latin America, analyze the impact of history, geography, politics and economics in Latin American documentary; investigate the representation of ethnic, racial, class, regional and gender identities in Latin American documentary; and develop basic skills to create a documentary in Spanish. At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to create their own documentary projects.
 

SPAN 6460/4460: Hispanic Digital Cultures
Tues/Thurs, 3:00-4:15 pm | Instructor: Osvaldo Cleger | CRN 91293

In this course, students will learn about recent developments in the fields of New Media and Digital Culture within the context of Latin American and Spanish cultures and societies. Throughout the semester, students will be offered and overview of several of the most influential trends in New Media in the region, and will explore in depth the impact of new information and communications technologies on Hispanic Cultural traditions. Among the manifestations of digital culture that will be studied are: hypertext narrative, interactive narrative, digital poetry, literature for the iPad and mobile technology, blog-fictions, twitter literature, digital photography, and video games. In addition to learning about these recent cultural trends, students will be able to develop skills for both the analysis of computational media in a variety of formats and the production of digital artifacts using appropriate software and design principles. The course covers the pre-computational trends the helped pave the way for the emergence of new media (comic culture, experimental and avant-garde arts, hypertexts in print format, etc.), the main manifestations of digital culture in the Hispanic context, and the technical vocabulary for the analysis of texts and works in multimedia format.


SPAN 6501: Theory and Foundations Seminar (MS-ALIS Core)
Tues/Thurs, 9:30-10:45 am | Instructors: Kelly Comfort, Osvaldo Cleger, Juan Carlos Rodriguez | CRN: 91283

This course is required for students pursuing the MS-ALIS or BS/MS-ALIS, and can count as a Spanish-language elective for the MS-GMC. The course covers theoretical texts related to three course modules: (1) Social and Intercultural Studies; (2) Literary, Media Studies and Technology; or (3) Linguistics and Language Application.  It will introduce students to major theoretical readings and requires their application in a variety of assignments. The main objective of the course is to increase theoretical knowledge and practical applications in key areas of language and culture study. By providing a three-pronged foundation in culture, literature/media, and linguistics, graduate students will be prepared to research and work in a variety of sectors upon completion of their degree. Students will identify, investigate, and analyze cultural and social problems in a variety of oral, visual and written texts, both print and digital, through the application of relevant critical theories.  Students will identify and use scholarly sources, both print and online, successfully, which includes the ability to demonstrate accepted methods of citation, to detect author bias, and to read critically. Students will be able to understand and collaborate across cultures with other professionals who explore similar topics and themes.

Literature, Media & Communication

Literature, Media, and Communication Electives 

Below are several globally-oriented elective courses currently scheduled in Literature, Media, and Communication. Please check oscar.gatech.edu for the most up-to-date information on courses offered this semester. 
 

LMC 6366: Global Science Fictions
Mon/Wed, 3:00-4:15 pm | Instructor: Lisa Yaszek | CRN: 91900

The course explores science fiction (SF) as a global language that enables people to communicate their ideas about science and technology across centuries, continents, and cultures. We will begin by reviewing the five major global circuits that define world SF today, with specific attention to their historical and cultural contexts. We will then explore how artists connect with each other and with audiences across these global circuits through their shared use of science fiction’s fundamental building blocks, including the novum, future history, neologisms, imaginary science, the technological sublime, and the technological grotesque.
 

LMC 8910: Game of Thrones and Media
Tues/Thurs, 9:30 am - 10:45 am | Instructor: Richard Utz | CRN: 91901

Game of Thrones is the most successful TV show ever. It has won more Emmys than other prime-time series; it is broadcast in at least 170 countries; and several episodes of its final season reached close to 40 million viewers worldwide. Based on a thorough investigation of various aspects of the TV series, this seminar will offer students an opportunity to investigate why so many viewers in the 21st century seek to connect with their premodern 'roots', which imagined aspects of premodern culture attract contemporary reinvention, recreation, re-enactment and re-present-ation, and how premodern narrative elements drive the work of contemporary artists, writers, and scholars.


Independent Study Option:

LMC 8803: Cultures of Empire and Globalization
Day/Time TBC | Instructor: Narin Hassan | CRN: 92123
Permission required. Email Aaron Santesso to request enrollment.

This course will examine a range of material, including historical documents, fictional texts, travel narratives, critical essays, visual images, and theoretical texts to examine the expansion of empire and its impact on global culture. We will focus primarily upon empires of the nineteenth-century and contemporary post-colonial responses to European colonization. Issues surrounding immigration, globalization, nationalism, imperial subjectivity, belonging, and postcolonial identity will be the central to the course. We will discuss the ideological, cultural and political struggles of colonized nations, the relationship of technology and globalization to colonialism and modernity, and the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality and nationality in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Along with primary texts, much of our reading and analysis will engage with theoretical debates in the interdisciplinary field of postcolonial studies.  

Research (VIP)

Research (VIP Teams)

"Vertically Integrated Projects" (VIP) is a Georgia Tech-wide and multi-university program that provides students with the opportunity to participate in a research project over multiple semesters. VIP is now available in the School of Modern Languages in three teams.  

Why join a VIP team?

"VIP Teams" are not traditional courses. They are teams of faculty, grad students, and undergraduates working on a real-world project or problem. VIPs provide hands-on experience in research, media production, and professional development. They are an opportunity to think creatively, participate in professional-level work outside the classroom, and join our faculty in "changing the conversation" about cross-cultural issues here in Atlanta and globally. 

How to apply: 

To join a VIP team, email the faculty adviser and fill out the brief online application available at Georgia Tech's VIP program website (below). The application takes about 5 minutes to complete. You can enroll in a VIP for 1, 2, or 3 credit hours. We strongly encourage grad students join a team for 3 credit hours, so your enrollment will reflect the level of work involved.

VIP credits do not count toward the minimum required 12 credits per semester, as they offer extracurricular work experience. 

VIP Application Portal:

Apply for a VIP team here

 

Modern Languages VIP Teams

 

21st Century Global Atlanta

Monday, 4:30-5:20 pm (4:45-5:35) | Advisors: Sebnem Ozkan and Jenny Strakovsky

Course number: VIP 6601/2/3 - VW6 | CRN: 91927

Languages: all

This project aims to tell the story of Atlanta as a global city, and to increase access to global citizenship at Georgia Tech and nationally. We want to document and connect with the individuals and communities that are transforming Atlanta into a global metropolis, such as heritage and immigrant communities, foreign-born residents in a variety of professional fields, and thought leaders engaged in the global community. We will document their everyday contributions and journeys through documentary film, multimedia, digital archives, writing, and research presentations. We welcome students who want to do creative work such as graphic novels and photography. Team members will participate in all aspects of background research, multimedia/creative production, and public outreach efforts of the program. Detailed Description

 

East Asian Media

Wednesday, 12:20-1:10 pm | Advisor: Amanda Weiss 

VIP 6601/2/3 - VWF | CRN: 92004

Languages: Japanese, Chinese, Korean

This is a bi-monthly seminar group that will be run like a Japanese “zemi,” or graduate seminar. Students will be asked to produce a research project or creative project on a topic related to East Asian media, broadly defined. This could be a translation of a Chinese short story, an analysis of Japanese films, a short documentary on social movements in Okinawa, etc. Transnational and comparative projects are welcome. Twice a month we will also meet to discuss assigned readings and to discuss project progress. At the end of each semester we will host an East Asian Media @ Tech Symposium to present our projects to the wider community. Each year has a different theme; 2019-2020 will be “East Asia and the Future.” Our readings will discuss how Chinese, Japanese, and Korean speculative literature and film articulate fears, anxieties, dreams, and desires about the future of the Pacific region. Student projects are encouraged but not required to connect to this theme. Detailed Description

 

Polivision: Multimedia, Arts & Culture

Wednesday, 12:20-1:10 pm | Instructor: Paul Alonso

VIP 6601/2/3 - VX9 | CRN: TBC

 Languages: Spanish

How are Latinx and Global Cultures manifested in Atlanta’s arts and entertainment? How do these identities dialogue with the United States and other cultural realities in today’s globalized world? To consolidate a bilingual and multimedia outlet (https://poli.vision/) about Latinx and Global Cultures. Students, professionals and faculty participate in the production, marketing and dissemination of bilingual multimedia pieces (videos, podcasts, interactive media, and social media narratives) about transnational arts and culture, as a way to reflect the multi-cultural reality of Atlanta as a global city. In times of a crisis of the traditional journalism industry, this project also seeks to set foundations for a new alternative and sustainable model for media production based in the collaboration of the academics, media professionals, and students. Detailed Description

Individual/Experiential Courses

Individual/Experiential Courses

Experiential courses are a signature of our program. They are individually designed in consultation with faculty, and are meant to provide hands-on experience in a work context, either through a teaching apprenticeship or an internship. These courses can count toward your final project if taken during Summer Semester. 

 In order to do one of these courses, please contact the faculty member that you would like to work with, as well as any other individuals mentioned in the course descriptions below. Experiential courses must be planned in advance in order to make available the appropriate course numbers. Here are the deadlines to request an experiential course for each semester: 

Fall Semester: August 1
Spring Semester: November 1
Summer Semester: March 1
 



6510: Language Practicum 
CHIN/FREN/GRMN/JAPN/RUSS/SPAN 6510
Meeting times and instructor TBC individually

Gain teaching and research experience by serving as an apprentice instructor in a 3000- or 4000-level course. Apprentices are not traditional TAs. They take a leadership role in the course by conducting research on course topics, teaching 1-2 sessions of the course, and designing teaching materials in the target language. This course provides training in research, teaching, advising, and leadership. Appointments must be approved by the faculty instructor and program advisors.

In order to do a Language Practicum, please contact the instructor of the course and the Program Director of the language program via one email, and please copy Dr. Strakovsky and Dr. Rodriguez.

 

6511: Language Practicum Abroad
CHIN/FREN/GRMN/JAPN/RUSS/SPAN 6511
Meeting times and instructor TBC individually

Gain teaching and research experience by serving as an apprentice instructor during one of our signature study abroad programs, including Language for Business and Technology or a lower-level study abroad program. Apprentices are not traditional TAs. They take a leadership role in the program by conducting research on course topics, teaching 2 sessions of the course (which may include leading excursions), mentoring students abroad, and designing teaching materials in the target language. Participants may be required to begin participation in the Language Practicum Abroad during Spring Semester in order to adequately prepare for the intensive summer format. This course provides training in research, teaching, advising, and leadership. Appointments must be approved by the faculty instructor and program advisors.

In order to do a Language Practicum, please contact the instructor of the course and the Program Director of the language program via one email, and please copy Dr. Strakovsky and Dr. Rodriguez.

 

6695 or 6696: Internship Abroad
CHIN/FREN/GRMN/JAPN/RUSS/SPAN 6695/6696
Meeting times and instructor TBC individually

Internships typically serve as a final project for students. Students completing an internship for 3 credit hours must complete at least 88.5 hours of work for the internship provider and 8 hours of video conferencing with their internship advisor. Students completing an internship for 6 credit hours must complete at least 201 hours of work for the internship provider and 8 hours of video conferencing with their internship advisor. To count as a final project, the internship experience must include a substantive reflective or analytical product that engages with the concerns and issues of the industry and professional experience. 

In order to begin the process of arranging an internship, please schedule a consultation with Dr. Strakovsky. There are a number of partner organizations we work with, as well as best practices in designing an individualized internship, and we look forward to working with you to find one that works for you.